Tag: Poultry

Animal RescuesProfiles

Pebbles

Pebbles (rooster) Arrived 23 October 2017

Little Pebbles was found wandering about in Lockridge. A caring member of the public discovered him, and took him in. She was unable to locate his owner, and as she lived in a residential area, she was unable to keep him.

Pebbles is now housemates with Dino and Rocket, the threesome seem to be enjoying each others company and are loving sanctuary life.

 

Would you like to help us to take care of Pebbles?  One off donations and sponsorship gifts are available now to support our work. Thank you for caring about farm animals.

**  Happy Hooves Farm Sanctuary – Where The Good Life Begins  **

Animal RescuesProfiles

The West Busselton Five

Falcon, Sherbet, Popcorn, Pepper & Rocket (roosters) Arrived 8th August 2017

Sherbet, Falcon, Popcorn, Pepper and Rocket were the result of backyard hatching. Their owner’s already had a flock of chicken, one being a particularly broody hen. Their children asked if they could obtain some eggs to raise under her. Though they didn’t consider how they would accommodate them, should some be born male. This is something she now feels very sorry about, and hopes others learn from her experience.

The mother of the house embarked on a mission to find these boys a caring home. She emailed every vet and sanctuary within a 200km radius, and advertised them publicly, though this proved to be unsuccessful, and only attracted people with unsavoury plans for the roosters. Finally there was a light at the end of the tunnel, as she had discovered a place that called itself a rooster rescue. She had three in-depth conversations with the owner before deciding that this would be the rooster’s new home.

After a 300km drive with 5 roosters and 2 children in the car, she arrived at the so-called rooster rescue. But when she arrived, she realised she had been deceived. They had arrived at what she called a very inhumane place, a scene of many caged and neglected birds – It was clearly not a loving home for roosters, or any animal for that matter.

She and the kids sat in the driveway of this place in tears, as the property owner hassled her about leaving the roosters with him. She knew she could not leave her boys at such a horrible place. She rang us while she was in his driveway, very distraught and explained the whole story. Luckily we were able to make some room for them, and she continued to drive for another hour up to the sanctuary.

The boys settled in nicely, but unfortunately a couple of weeks after their arrival little Falcon became flat one evening. We had arranged to get him to the vet the next morning and in the meantime we kept in inside and tended to him, but sadly he didn’t make it through the night.

The four remaining roosters are doing really well, and are enjoying life here at Happy Hooves.

 

 

Would you like to help us to take care of these boys?  One off donations and sponsorship gifts are available now to support our work. Thank you for caring about farm animals.

**  Happy Hooves Farm Sanctuary – Where The Good Life Begins  **

Profiles

The Flinstones

FRED(Australorp rooster)
WILMA (Australorp hen)
BLACK BETTY (Australorp hen)
DINO (Araurcana rooster)

Arrived 21 November 2015

These four were rescued from a property where they had been left to fend for themselves after foreclosure. We don’t know their history, but we do know their future looks a lot brighter!

UPDATE: We were very sad to say goodbye to Black Betty yesterday (20 July 2016). Despite immediate veterinary attention, a course of antibiotics for bacterial crop infection, a course of anti-inflammatories and a follow up visit, she succumbed to what the vet believed was a gastrointestinal tumour, with the crop infection secondary.

 

Would you like to help us to take care of Fred, Wilma or Dino?  One off donations and sponsorship gifts are available now to support our work. Thank you for caring about farm animals.

 

**  Happy Hooves Farm Sanctuary – Where The Good Life Begins  **

 

Profiles

The Fantastic Four

Mikey, Roy, Rusty and Valentino (roosters) Arrived 15 May 2016

These four handsome hunks came to us via a friend whose neighbour bought young (what she thought were) hens from a heritage breeder. When it turned out that four of them were in fact roosters, she was going to return them to the trader, but was told they would likely be put down. So here they are with us, taking our total to seven roosters. They alternate with the hens to free-range so that there’s no hanky panky, and it’s a beautiful sight to see fully grown roosters out in the sun and the pastures, scratching around, foraging and dust-bathing.

Welcome to heaven boys!

Would you like to help us to take care of the Fantastic Four?  One off donations and sponsorship gifts are available now to support our work. Thank you for caring about farm animals.

 

**  Happy Hooves Farm Sanctuary – Where The Good Life Begins  **

 

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Wilma

Wilma (Australorp hen) Arrived 12 November 2015

Wilma came to us with Black Betty, Fred and Dino. They had been abandoned by previous owner on a property which was seized by the bank. Lovely real estate agents fed them. gave them fresh water and alerted us to our plight. They have all been recuperating with us since they got here, but Wilma and Black Betty are now out with the other hens with free run of the property

 

 

Would you like to help us to take care of Wilma?  One off donations and sponsorship gifts are available now to support our work. Thank you for caring about farm animals.

 

**  Happy Hooves Farm Sanctuary – Where The Good Life Begins  **

 

Rainbow Bridge

Black Betty – Rainbow Bridge

Black Betty (Australorp hen) Arrived 12 November 2015

UPDATE 20 July 2016:

We were very sad to say goodbye to Black Betty today. Despite immediate veterinary attention, a course of antibiotics for bacterial crop infection, a course of anti-inflammatories and a follow up visit, she succumbed to what the vet believed was a gastrointestinal tumour, with the crop infection secondary.

She had a happy 8 months of food, freedom, friendship, dust baths and love while she was here.

Black Betty came to us with Wilma, Fred and Dino. They had been abandoned by previous owner on a property which was seized by the bank. Lovely real estate agents fed them. gave them fresh water and alerted us to our plight. They have all been recuperating with us since they got here, but Black Betty and Wilma are now out with the other hens with free run of the property

 
Would you like to help us to take care any of the other animals still with us?  One off donations and sponsorship gifts are available now to support our work. Thank you for caring about farm animals.

**  Happy Hooves Farm Sanctuary – Where The Good Life Begins  **

 …and sometimes where a good life ends too

 

 

Profiles

Peter

Peter (duck – Appleyard x). Arrived 20 November 2015

This stunningly beautiful duck was rescued from Tomato Lake, Belmont, suffering from botulism; she was given intensive care by one of the wonderful WA Seabird Rescue people, but was unable to stay in suburbia due to her very loud and frequent quacking; she was brought to Happy Hooves where she still has a little bit of rehabilitation to do. Peter hangs out with the hens and is even starting to sound like she’s learning to cluck!

 

Would you like to help us to take care of Peter?  One off donations and sponsorship gifts are available now to support our work. Thank you for caring about farm animals.

 

**  Happy Hooves Farm Sanctuary – Where The Good Life Begins  **

 

Rainbow Bridge

Betty Lou, Charlene, Daisy Mae, Marlene, Sue Ellen, and Thelma – RAINBOW BRIDGE

The Trailer Trash Girls (hens). Arrived 4 May 2015

UPDATE 5 AGUST 2016:

Sue Ellen has joined the other Trailer Trash hens over the Rainbow Bridge. She succumbed to egg peritonitis after bravely battling it for a couple of months – coming good twice with vet treatment, draining the abdomen and antibiotics. We are so glad we could give them some joy and love in their short lives. May they all forage free in peace now.

Sadly, Sue Ellen is now the last remaining hen out of these six ladies. They all succumbed to some form of egg yolk peritonitis or abdominal tumours that this Isa Brown breed have had foisted upon them by the greedy egg industry – bred to produce 250 to 300 eggs annually as opposed to the 10 to 15 wild hens would lay every year. They all received vet attention – some, multiple vet visits, but in the end there was nothing we could do except have them humanely euthanised. Sue Ellen is now suffering from a suspected adenocarcinoma/abdominal tumours. She is being treated with antibiotics, but we won’t let her suffer.

These five feisty gals got their name from the fact that they were discovered in a Kalamunda Park, obviously dumped like trash, and had to spend two weeks in quarantine – the only place we had available that provided them with a comfortable home sheltered from the elements for that long, was a covered trailer, hence ‘Trailer Trash’.

They now have the run of the property – their forever home, and relish exploring, scratching, dust-bathing and pecking. We are so happy to have been able to give these five girls a home, but just regret that one of the initial six – Maylene, passed away from unknown cause soon after arriving – all the others are in tip top health and looking more glorious every day.

 

 

Would you like to help us to take care of the Trailer Trash Girls?  One off donations and sponsorship gifts are available now to support our work. Thank you for caring about farm animals.

 

**  Happy Hooves Farm Sanctuary – Where The Good Life Begins  **

 

Rainbow Bridge

Chick Pea, Sweet Pea and Maisie – Rainbow Bridge

Chick Pea, Sweet Pea & Maisie (hens). Arrived 2 April 2015

UPDATE: We are very sad to have had to say goodbye to Maisie on Monday 8 June 2015. At six years old, she had lived a very long life for an Isa Brown hen, and all the extra love, care, special food and vet visits just wasn’t enough. Maisie need to let go, so we took her back to our fantastic avian vet and he helped her on her way. We hope you are at peace now, Maisie – forever foraging, pecking and dust-bathing in the green fields of home.

UPDATE:

On February 22, 2017 we said goodbye to a dear friend, Chick Pea. A few days ago, we noticed that Chick Pea wasn’t her vibrant self, she was quite flat and on closer inspection we discovered she had a watery crop. A visit to the vet confirmed a fungal crop infection.

After a few days of treatment there seemed to be no improvement, she was still lethargic and eating very little. Yesterday she was taken straight back to the vet, as she was no longer able to walk. Tests confirmed it was Avian Lymphoid Leukosis – the fungal infection had masked a more sinister disease.

There is no treatment for Lymphoid Leukosis, and her condition would only have worsened until she passed naturally. We decided it was best to end her suffering prematurely, and she was put to sleep. She will be laid to rest today at the Sanctuary.

We will miss having her here, I’m sure Louis (the little Bantam rooster) and her fellow hens will miss her too – foraging, pecking and dust-bathing together around the property.

Rest in Peace sweet girl. ?

 

UDDATE: On May 29, 2017 we lost another Happy Hooves resident – Sweet Pea the hen. She arrived at the sanctuary in 2015 with her friends Chick Pea and Maisie (who have sadly also passed). Unfortunately Isa Brown’s only have a life expectancy of 2-3 years, and at just over 3 years of age, Sweet Pea’s time had come. We will miss this darling girl. Rest easy Sweet Pea ?

These three ladies ended up at Happy Hooves because of ongoing mite infestations in their suburban home. Neighbours had started to complain about the spread of mites into their property and despite ongoing attention and treatment, the previous owner was finding it increasingly difficult to control infestations, so knowing that these three hens would have just as good-a-life or better here with us, they made a move to the country and have settled in well.

Maisie was a spent laying hen re-homed from an egg facility about four years ago and aMAISIEngly is still going strong! Chick Pea and Sweet Pea were both a bit younger when they came to be with this compassionate hen-lover and Maisie became their “mum” by default.

They are very gorgeous girls who currently tend to stick to themselves, but they have lovely neighbours in Yuki & Kenji, and the Trailer Trash Five – Daisy Mae, Betty Lou, Sue Ellen, Charlene and Thelma (now deceased).

Maisie has some health concerns at the moment (June 2015) and is getting lots of extra care, inside reCOOPeration and vet visits as required. She wasn’t eating or drinking much for a while there and we feared the worst, but (fingers crossed) she appears to have bounced back somewhat and we will continue to take very special care of her and spoil her with her favourite food, warm rooms and cuddles.

 

 
Would you like to help us to take care any of the other animals still with us?  One off donations and sponsorship gifts are available now to support our work. Thank you for caring about farm animals.

**  Happy Hooves Farm Sanctuary – Where The Good Life Begins  **

 …and sometimes where a good life ends too